Consumers have little time to pay attention to a brand. With all the advertisements coming in, the average consumer not only fails to remember but actually ignores many of those messages.
 
Since advertising in the usual way, like television, print, billboard and digital, can be easily ignored, many marketers have increasingly resorted to special events to attract attention. Because when marketed well, special events can build a strong preference for a brand not only among the people who actually participate, such as in a concert or a race, but much more importantly, among all the other people who see the marketing effort.
 
It is the audience of the general marketing effort which can be far more important in actually moving volume, often more than the actual participants in an event. The reason could be the marketing for a special event can be very much engaging for viewers than the brand’s advertisements. Or maybe the brand does not have the money for heavy advertising campaigns. It can also be that the special event contains something that people find more engaging such as real people who are also striving or maybe they can relate their own needs or dreams.
 
The other day, I was looking through some reports on running events and noticed that in many cases, sponsorships did not seem to have much potential for building brand equity. The link between the brand sponsor and running was either not strong, or was not maximized either in the marketing communications or the mechanics of the event.
 
But some sponsorship did seem to promise better results. Including one which changed the usual race format to better support the idea the brand stood for. “The Last Man Running” event is a race sponsored by Rogin-E, a brand often associated with potency among older males. They held an event last 2011 with the blurb “Tatagal ka ba?” and insisted “Longer is Better” while the tagline for this year hectored you with ”Can you go another round?”. The race last year required runners to maintain a speed or get swept off the course. This year, the challenge is to run another round for a total of seven hours. So the brand and running were tied together by the idea of sustained physical effort.
 
Maybe next year, they might consider finding a way to highlight runners who are over 40 years old to bring out more strongly the connection to stamina in mature men.
 
There are other examples of special events which managed to not only entertain their audiences but also build a strong impression of what a brand is good for. Such that when the special event is done, the audience has been sold on the brand far more effectively than with pure advertising.
 
There’s a case in kitchen paper towels. A boring product, nothing like an iPad. Luckily, most of us do not sell iPads, so this lesson can be useful.
 
A US brand knew that their category’s main buyers were women. They knew that most women have an ideal man.
 
So they ran a promotion that asked women to name a strong man whose picture would be placed on the package of the brand as a symbol of strength, replacing the brand’s iconic man on the package. Strength was important because it was the kitchen towel’s selling point.
The promotion went beautifully. Sales and market share exceeded expectations even after the event, which indicated a favorable effect beyond the actual promotional period.
 
 
Why? I am sure that many women actually sent in nomination forms naming their ideal man, like what the winner did. But I don’t think that explains the volume increase.
 
One of the other reasons for growth must have been that other supermarket shoppers who were not current users of the brand were also hit by the promotional activity. The brand’s message was still talking about strength but doing it in a more interesting way than the usual advertising. The message probably touched the feelings and longings of a lot of women, feelings of love and appreciation for their own men, or just their feelings for an ideal man.
 
The brand was able to build up its association with the idea of “strength” by riding on many women’s feelings, and did it in a way that its usual advertising probably could not, which is what special events should do.
 
 
Benedicto “Poch” Cid is the Chief Brand Adviser of Mansmith and Fielders, Inc. (www.mansmith.net), the leading marketing and sales training company in the Philippines. Poch will conduct a seminar entitled Consumer Promotion Planning Essentials on July 17-18, 2012.  For inquiries, please email info@mansmith.net call (+63-2) 584-5858 /412-0034 or text (63) 918-81-168-88. Please also send your marketing, sales and strategy questions to mentors@mansmith.net.
 
 
Total number of words: 797
 Consumers have little time to pay attention to a brand. With all the advertisements coming in, the average consumer not only fails to remember but actually ignores many of those messages.
 
Since advertising in the usual way, like television, print, billboard and digital, can be easily ignored, many marketers have increasingly resorted to special events to attract attention. Because when marketed well, special events can build a strong preference for a brand not only among the people who actually participate, such as in a concert or a race, but much more importantly, among all the other people who see the marketing effort.
 
It is the audience of the general marketing effort which can be far more important in actually moving volume, often more than the actual participants in an event. The reason could be the marketing for a special event can be very much engaging for viewers than the brand’s advertisements. Or maybe the brand does not have the money for heavy advertising campaigns. It can also be that the special event contains something that people find more engaging such as real people who are also striving or maybe they can relate their own needs or dreams.
 
The other day, I was looking through some reports on running events and noticed that in many cases, sponsorships did not seem to have much potential for building brand equity. The link between the brand sponsor and running was either not strong, or was not maximized either in the marketing communications or the mechanics of the event.
 
But some sponsorship did seem to promise better results. Including one which changed the usual race format to better support the idea the brand stood for. “The Last Man Running” event is a race sponsored by Rogin-E, a brand often associated with potency among older males. They held an event last 2011 with the blurb “Tatagal ka ba?” and insisted “Longer is Better” while the tagline for this year hectored you with ”Can you go another round?”. The race last year required runners to maintain a speed or get swept off the course. This year, the challenge is to run another round for a total of seven hours. So the brand and running were tied together by the idea of sustained physical effort.
 
Maybe next year, they might consider finding a way to highlight runners who are over 40 years old to bring out more strongly the connection to stamina in mature men.
 
There are other examples of special events which managed to not only entertain their audiences but also build a strong impression of what a brand is good for. Such that when the special event is done, the audience has been sold on the brand far more effectively than with pure advertising.
 
There’s a case in kitchen paper towels. A boring product, nothing like an iPad. Luckily, most of us do not sell iPads, so this lesson can be useful.
 
A US brand knew that their category’s main buyers were women. They knew that most women have an ideal man.
 
So they ran a promotion that asked women to name a strong man whose picture would be placed on the package of the brand as a symbol of strength, replacing the brand’s iconic man on the package. Strength was important because it was the kitchen towel’s selling point.
The promotion went beautifully. Sales and market share exceeded expectations even after the event, which indicated a favorable effect beyond the actual promotional period.
 
 
Why? I am sure that many women actually sent in nomination forms naming their ideal man, like what the winner did. But I don’t think that explains the volume increase.
 
One of the other reasons for growth must have been that other supermarket shoppers who were not current users of the brand were also hit by the promotional activity. The brand’s message was still talking about strength but doing it in a more interesting way than the usual advertising. The message probably touched the feelings and longings of a lot of women, feelings of love and appreciation for their own men, or just their feelings for an ideal man.
 
The brand was able to build up its association with the idea of “strength” by riding on many women’s feelings, and did it in a way that its usual advertising probably could not, which is what special events should do.
 
 
Benedicto “Poch” Cid is the Chief Brand Adviser of Mansmith and Fielders, Inc. (www.mansmith.net), the leading marketing and sales training company in the Philippines. For inquiries, please email info@mansmith.net call (+63-2) 584-5858 /412-0034 or text (63) 918-81-168-88. Please also send your marketing, sales and strategy questions to mentors@mansmith.net.